Americans spend 43% of their media time with TVs, and advertisers fittingly spend 42% of their advertising budgets on the platform. Yet only 1% of advertising budgets are allocated to mobile on average, even though consumers are spending 10% of their time there.

Mashable, As Mobile Traffic Ramps Up, Hearst Looks to Monetize, June 18, 2012

Americans spend 43% of their media time with TVs, and advertisers fittingly spend 42% of their advertising budgets on the platform. Yet only 1% of advertising budgets are allocated to mobile on average, even though consumers are spending 10% of their time there.

Mashable, As Mobile Traffic Ramps Up, Hearst Looks to Monetize, June 18, 2012

PEW-Research: Targeted Advertizing

Roughly two-thirds of internet users (68%) have an unfavorable view of the practice, saying they are not okay with targeted advertising because they do not like having their online behavior tracked and analyzed. Some 28% said they are okay with targeted advertising because it means they see advertisements and get information about things they are really interested in.


(Source: pewinternet.org)

futurejournalismproject:

The Collapse of Print Advertising in One Graph

Call it creative if you want, but this is what economic destruction looks like. Print newspaper ads have fallen by two-thirds from $60 billion in the late-1990s to $20 billion in 2011. You sometimes hear it said that newspapers are dead. Now, $20 billion is the kind of “dead” most people would trade their lives for. You never hear anybody say “bars and nightclubs are dead!” when in fact that industry’s current revenue amounts to an identical $20 billion.So the reason newspapers are in trouble isn’t that they aren’t making lots of money — they still are; advertising is a huge, huge business, as any app developer will try to tell you — but that their business models and payroll depend on so much more money. The U.S. newspaper industry was built to support $50 billion to $60 billion in total advertising with the kind of staffs that a $50 billion industry can abide. The layoffs, buyouts, and bankruptcies you hear about are the result of this massive correction in the face of falling revenue. The Internet took out print’s knees in the last decade — not all print, but a lot.
Read more. [Image: Mark J. Perry]

Via theatlantic.
 

futurejournalismproject:

The Collapse of Print Advertising in One Graph

Call it creative if you want, but this is what economic destruction looks like. Print newspaper ads have fallen by two-thirds from $60 billion in the late-1990s to $20 billion in 2011. 

You sometimes hear it said that newspapers are dead. Now, $20 billion is the kind of “dead” most people would trade their lives for. You never hear anybody say “bars and nightclubs are dead!” when in fact that industry’s current revenue amounts to an identical $20 billion.

So the reason newspapers are in trouble isn’t that they aren’t making lots of money — they still are; advertising is a huge, huge business, as any app developer will try to tell you — but that their business models and payroll depend on so much more money. The U.S. newspaper industry was built to support $50 billion to $60 billion in total advertising with the kind of staffs that a $50 billion industry can abide. The layoffs, buyouts, and bankruptcies you hear about are the result of this massive correction in the face of falling revenue. The Internet took out print’s knees in the last decade — not all print, but a lot.

Read more. [Image: Mark J. Perry]

Via theatlantic.

 

(via futurejournalismproject)

Most of the news sites did not feature ads targeted to consumers based on their online behavior. Just three of the 22-CNN, the New York Times and Yahoo News-employed high levels of targeting, delivering different ads to the researchers based on that person’s recent online activity. A handful of other sites had some limited targeting, mostly in the form of smaller ads on internal news pages. For sites that do target their ads, the practice of erasing one’s browser history, or “cookies,” had virtually no effect. The same level of targeting occurred.

Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, February 13, 2012

Another example of how traditional publishing organizations struggle with personalization: the same way content is communicated 1:n ads are, too. Print and TV cannot do better, but online can. When will publishers realize?