Now, with digital technologies in the hand of billions of consumers, we are indeed ignoring what we have no use for, and from our media we expect a lot more than meaningless noise and interruptions. If we provide our cherished data we will expect perfect matches, i.e. a sprinkler system of truly good stuff not a fire-hose of noise.

Because we can now wield data as our currency, we will no longer tolerate interruptions, meaningless pitches, disruptive pop-ups or junk email. Very soon we will be open only for truly personalized offers, real meaning, solid relevance, timeliness, word-of-mouth, and yes, real transparency and truthfulness.

You need to find opportunity in entirely new models, in the new scale, in abundance. Google finds value in scale by taking on risk for the advertiser (who pays only for clicks) and by increasing relevance by putting ads everywhere. Facebook finds value in relationships and data about them and it doesn’t sell content but does use content as a tool to generate more data about users and their interests.

Jeff Jarvis on Buzz Machine, January 2, 2012

Switching from a scarcity to an abundance model still seems to be the biggest road block for publishers. Abundance means you filter and curate, scarcity means you own the story. There aren’t many stories one can own for more than a glimpse today. So better start filtering and curating while you still have the distribution channel.

(Source: buzzmachine.com)

It won’t be front-page news or sexy, but adding customer relationship management and tying social CRM functionality to marketing efforts will improve our ability as marketers to hit relevant audiences with relevant messages at relevant times and in relevant places,” predicts Jason Falls, founder of Social Media Explorer. “Companies without relevancy in messaging as a priority will fall behind.
We agree to all the points except for the pair “relevant - usefull”. Relevance is depending on the interests and the actual context of an individual content consumer. Whether the content is usefull depends on the value it carries for the individual reader, but again does not depend on the format.

We agree to all the points except for the pair “relevant - usefull”. Relevance is depending on the interests and the actual context of an individual content consumer. Whether the content is usefull depends on the value it carries for the individual reader, but again does not depend on the format.

Can an algorithm serve us serendipity? Maybe, if it has enough signals of what we and people we trust like, what interests us, what we need, our context. It can calculate and predict and try to serve our relevance and serendipity. I think serendipity comes not from one-size-fits-all editing but from better targeting across a larger pool of possibilities.
Jeff Jarvis, Serendipity is unexpected relevance, March 30th, 2010

Relevance spans across all the quadrants of the Discovery Matrix above,  and none of the above approaches to filtering for relevance is the ‘best  approach’. There is no killer approach to Relevance. …  The competitive edge will be with services that support multiple  discovery methods, multiple filtering approaches, have flexibility, and  support multiple mobile platforms.


 
 
   Mahendra Palsule, The Age Of Relevance, March 3rd, 2011 on TechCrunch

Relevance spans across all the quadrants of the Discovery Matrix above, and none of the above approaches to filtering for relevance is the ‘best approach’. There is no killer approach to Relevance. … The competitive edge will be with services that support multiple discovery methods, multiple filtering approaches, have flexibility, and support multiple mobile platforms.

  The Age Of Relevance, March 3rd, 2011 on TechCrunch
Relevance relates news to individuals or small groups of readers, often through personalisation and localisation. Journalists will provide value through a deep understanding of focused groups, the issues they face and the decisions they need to make.