Now that content curation has become mainstream and so many businesses are focused on contextualizing your actions, it’s their turn to flourish. Once the basis of human intent has been founded, you can pretty well guess what an individual’s next action will be. This drums up dreams of better advertising, properly targeted marketing, improved product recommendations and personalized data streams, all given back to the consumer. It’s an entire service built around a data model that understands you better than you understand yourself.
“If we gaze a bit further down the road, it’s reasonable to expect that content curators will employ the use of personalized and artificial intelligence technologies. Whether its a site with 20 million uniques, or one with 10 thousand, these tools will have the ability to learn and make assumptions about readers across publishers’ properties, and across the internet landscape, says Jarret Myer, CEO and Founder of UPROXX .
“These tools will have the ability to learn and make assumptions about groups of users, with the intent to serve the most desired content based on crowd sentiment. It’s also possible to expect there won’t be a need for editors to curate and upload content to initiate conversation; personalization technologies will automate the process of curation by identifying topics of interest and uploading them in real-time.

In addition to the algorithmic measures, Google is taking the smoke and mirrors out of search by more openly communicating algorithm changes to SEOs and the general public.

Why? In some cases, black-hat tactics were inadvertent, caused by website administrators using outdated techniques or misinterpreting Google’s algorithmic intent. Furthermore, a good deal of high-quality content gets lost in the search shuffle because creators simply ignore SEO. More than ever, Google wants every website to be optimized and optimized properly. The more high-caliber content Google can serve up to users in SERPs, the more business it will do.

The trend: Google will push hard in this direction, devising more accurate methods of evaluating the relevance, substance and trustworthiness of content. It will get better at interpreting both the inherent quality of the work itself and the social-sharing data associated with it.

Smashing Magazine, How Content Creators Benefit From The New SEO, June 28, 2012
Prismatic is built around a complex system that provides large scale, real-time, dynamic personalized re-ranking of information, as well classifying and grouping topics into an ontology. Prismatic has recently announced new improvements, as well, so expect the team to continue to push the limits for news consumption. This discussion would be of interest to any online or social news junkies (like me) and/or developers who are fiddling with ideas of how to build on top of Twitter.
In today’s online world, personalization is increasingly making or breaking companies. The companies that win are the ones making personalization a key company value – not just a feature.
Scott Brave, CTO and co-founder, Baynote on TechCrunch May 18, 2012
Facebook will continue testing new formats in search of one that sends lots of referral traffic, but to high-quality articles. News reader developers should hold tight, talk to their Facebook reps about how changes are hurting user counts, and hope an optimal version of “recently read articles” emerges soon. But just because there was massive organic referral traffic to be had until now is no guarantee it will return.
The likes of Amazon and Netflix invest millions of dollars on designing the ”perfect” algorithm to predict what you’re likely to want next. Recommendation algorithms are hugely important within the e-commerce space – the history of your actions on the site will inform what the site suggests to you in future.
Action: You probably don’t have millions to invest in developing recommendation engines or fancy formulas that tell your customer what they should do next. What you can do is look a little bit wider than mass personalisation.

Relevance - The Key to Content Discovery by Scott Gray, May 2, 2012

Actually Relevancer provides “recommendation engines” and “fancy formulas” via a white label service for any website and it doesn’t cost millions.

Once the data outputs from different sites had been standardised, he said, our computers would be able to offer increasingly sophisticated services such as telling us what to read in the morning. “It will know not only what’s happening out there but also what I’ve read already and also what my mood is, and who I’m meeting later on.”
Both Hammond and Frankel insisted that, while Narrative Science will certainly replace some types of human-generated writing, the stories they’re most excited about are the ones journalists rarely cover. Because of readership expectations, no journalist would write a story with relevance to only one person, or a few—sports writers, for instance, don’t write about Little League games in the first place. That’s why the company’s putting special effort into what they call “audience of one” applications—narratives that bring professional-caliber prose insight where right now we only have confusing data.


Users already integrate digital messaging 
Thanks to the mobile devices we carry during our waking hours and the always-on connections of desktops, laptops, and tablets, there’s no longer any downtime from messaging. Today we see that:




Users access messaging in many ways. Users opt into and interact with digital messages through multiple channels like online email, mobile email, and SMS (see Figure 1 and see Figure 2). Increasingly these channels are accessed through a single device.
And they expect relevant messages across channels. Expectations for relevant messages across channels are higher than ever. As Jim Roemmer, senior director of the addressable media team at Gap Inc. Direct, explains: “Customers don’t care that a marketer is organized by channels — they want the marketer to stitch the multichannel experience all together.”

Forrester, The New Messaging Mandate, January 9, 2012

Users already integrate digital messaging

Thanks to the mobile devices we carry during our waking hours and the always-on connections of desktops, laptops, and tablets, there’s no longer any downtime from messaging. Today we see that:

  • Users access messaging in many ways. Users opt into and interact with digital messages through multiple channels like online email, mobile email, and SMS (see Figure 1 and see Figure 2). Increasingly these channels are accessed through a single device.
  • And they expect relevant messages across channels. Expectations for relevant messages across channels are higher than ever. As Jim Roemmer, senior director of the addressable media team at Gap Inc. Direct, explains: “Customers don’t care that a marketer is organized by channels — they want the marketer to stitch the multichannel experience all together.”

Forrester, The New Messaging Mandate, January 9, 2012

Reprinted from The End of Business as Usual, Chapter 14

This is why it’s critical that businesses shift resources away from social media monitoring and make a concerted move toward intelligence. This new listening movement will help businesses better understand who they’re trying to reach and what they value to inspire…well, everything. From marketing strategies to service models to new processes, products and services, intelligence becomes the key to meaningful engagement and ultimately increased awareness and relevance.

Brian Solis, Social media is about social science not technology, March 14, 2012

Reprinted from The End of Business as Usual, Chapter 14

This is why it’s critical that businesses shift resources away from social media monitoring and make a concerted move toward intelligence. This new listening movement will help businesses better understand who they’re trying to reach and what they value to inspire…well, everything. From marketing strategies to service models to new processes, products and services, intelligence becomes the key to meaningful engagement and ultimately increased awareness and relevance.

Brian Solis, Social media is about social science not technology, March 14, 2012